OD&D, played as Free Kriegsspiel, re-redux

Oh, I published several versions of this, but THIS one here is my go-to version:

0) Use the three Little Brown Books

1) Roll abilities
For every 15+, I write down “very” + the adjective that belongs to the characteristic, and for every 5 or lower, I write down the opposite of the adjective. All other numbers signify an unremarkable, average stat, simply forget about them.

2) Character Classes and Races
As usual, but don’t feel limited by them. You start with 1d6 hit points.

3) Spells
Clerics, Magic-users and elves get Spell Points. Magic-users get 4+Experience Level points, all other casters get 2+Level points.

All casters can cast spells of any level. A save is required to cast a spell successfully and avoid paying Spell Points. A failed roll means you lose Spell Points equal to the spell level.

The referee might consider giving out treasure that increases Spell Points. This might be done to counterbalance the more costly higher level spells (compared to the old system).

To record spells, casters can write, draw, etch, tattoo or paint the formulas on every suitable surface.

4) Attacks and Damage
Roll opposed 2d6 (with bonus for stronger side) , use a red d6 and a d6 with another color

higher roll hits

damage = red die

light or medium armor has Armor Class 1
heavy armor has Armor Class 2 or 3 (the latter being extremely rare)

The fighter who got hit rolls 1d6 and tries to roll under or equal to his Armor Class. If he does, the hit got deflected or softened by the armor, and he does not lose hit points. If the roll is over, the armor didn’t stop the hit, and he suffers damage as indicated by the red die.

5) Give them a fighting chance
Lenient referees, you might grant the player a last opposed roll to save their character from dying.

6) Experience
Gain an experience level if it is dramatically appropriate.

7) Equipment
Take 2d6 items, write them down as a list.
Then, lose 1d6 of them.

8) Super-extra add-on to make it more Blackmoor-ish
Write down two powers no other character has. The scope of these powers is determined by the referee.


So let’s make a character:

STR 9, not worth mentioning
INT 3, on my character sheet I’m writing “definitely not the brightest”
WIS 7, not worth mentioning
CON 15, on my character sheet I’m writing “tough”
DEX 16, on my character sheet I’m writing “agile”
CHA 11, not worth mentioning

I pick Fighting-Man as class, and Human as race. I start with 4 hp.

My Level is 1 (Veteran).

Now, I roll 2d6 to see how many items I get to pick: 3. Uh-oh.

I pick a Sword, Chainmail armor and Iron Rations.

Now, I roll 1d6 to see how many items I lose: 6. Bingo. I’m starting empty-handed, with just a pair of pants, a shirt, boots and maaaaybe a coat.

And yeah, this is a nod to Dave Arneson: I pick two powers. My referee wants our characters to start out as nobodies, so these powers will have to be mundane, almost. I pick: “make a lasting impression on people” and its opposite “be utterly forgettable”. The ref gives me a thumb-up.

So please let me introduce

____________________________________

Finn from Calmlakes
Human Fighting-Man Level 1 (Veteran)

definitely not the brightest, but tough and agile
hp: 4

Powers:
make lasting impression on people
be utterly forgettable

Equipment: none

____________________________________

One thought on “OD&D, played as Free Kriegsspiel, re-redux

  1. Very interesting!

    I’ve been experimenting for a couple years with an FKR ruleset inspired by you that went through the RPG Tinkerage to me. At this point it’s – describe a character, give it a handful of +1 and +2 attributes, roll 2d6; an average roll provides an expected result (warrior scores a hit, wizard gets his spell off), with high or low rolls things get interesting. And that’s it.

    I like the addition of equipment, but since I play with easily disappointed children would probably just leave it at “start with 1d6 items.” They would be lost only through play.

    Like

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