Playing Warhammer with the Landshut Rules, v2

Warhammer!

It doesn’t get any more British or European than that. Chaos beast men, tragic and dangerous magic, Warhammer has it all. Plus, Landshut is not only the title of my ancient school, free kriegsspiel rules, but also the name of my hometown, which happens to be… a medieval German town. Remember Altdorf, the city in the Old World of Warhammer? That’s a town about two miles from where I live. Just saying. Us Germans have bragging rights when it comes to Warhammer, right?
 
Okay, so now Warhammer. How can we play it with the Landshut Rules
 
Like so:
You need the Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying Game 1st edition. Because that’s the one and only. And please lose your copy of Zweihänder. Because it’s an abomination.
 
But first: You need a name! Names inspire and imprint your character’s personality.
 
1) STATS
Use 2d6 to determine Weapon Skill, Ballistic Skill, Strength, Toughness, Dexterity, Leadership, Intelligence, Cool, Will Power and Fellowship.
 
ONLY record a stat if you roll 2 or 3, or 11 or 12 for it. If it’s 2 or 3, write „low“ or „bad“, followed by the stat, and if it’s 11 or 12, write „high“ or good“, followed by the stat.
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2) Create your character with the help of the Warhammer 1e wiki
 
3) Humans get 5 hits, dwarves get 6 hits, elves and halflings get 4 hits.
 
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Optional Rule: Gore Die
 
Remember how you roll attacks with 2d6. These two dice should have different colors. ONE die is the Gore Die. The higher that die, the messier, bloodier, gorier your hit is. Note that a gory, bloody, bloodspraying, disgusting hit will not kill the opponent if he still has Hit Points left – but it will definitely put negative modifiers on his next attack roll, movement, abilities, skills and so on. Only when Hit Points are reduced to zero, a character dies. To give you a few rough ideas for Gore Die results:
  • Gore 1: drop weapons, superficial wounds, hits that knock the wind out of you, stumble, bruises, stuns, knockdowns 
  • Gore 2: dislocations, shattered weapons, numb limbs 
  • Gore 3: incapacitated limbs, deep wounds, smashed teeth, broken bones 
  • Gore 4: severed arteries, internal bleeding, spine injuries, gouged out eyes 
  • Gore 5: half a limb lost, organs ruptured 
  • Gore 6: entire limb lost, body parts hacked in half 
  • Gore 7: Texas Chainsaw Massacre, flying body parts, fuck what a mess
Gore 7? How? This is another optional rule: When a character is down to 1 Hit, the next attack that takes him to his gods has Gore Die +3.
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12) MAGIC
Magic is the offspring of Chaos. It’s powerful, but dangerous. Choose one of six Schools of Magic you belong to. Each school practices one general type of magic.
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Amethyst = death, undeath, entropy
Ruby = fire, hell, blood
Amber = animals, monsters,emotion
Gold = metal, industry, physics
Moss = plants, plagues, life
Sapphire = time, abyss/stars, thought
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Casting Spells
Warhammer magicians start with (level+1) spell points. Spells are freeform – describe what you want to achieve, and the referee will roll 2d6 against your Magic Dice. Roll your 2d6 at the same time. Magic is a fickle mistress, you never know if you can surf the waves of magic – or drown in them. That’s why the referee always rolls against you, instead of determining a target number you have to beat.

 

The only wizards facing great dangers are Demonologists, Necromancers, and Evil and Chaotic magicians. They gain Insanity Points and Disabilities, or increase the chances of contracting Tomb Rot (necromancers, I’m looking at you).

If you roll successfully, you cast the spell, and it costs you zero spell points. If you fail the roll, you still cast the spell, but it costs you (spell level) spell points.

This is Warhammer, so I’ll allow wizards to sacrifice 1 hit to gain 2 spell points.

A character example:
 
My name is Konrad Fuchs, from Eschendorf, a village in Stirland.
I roll completely average for all stats.
Over at the WH1 wiki, I’m rolling my character:
 
I’m a human, 1.7m tall, 50 years old (nice, exactly my real age)
4 Fate Points
 
I choose to be an Academic. 
I get 3 skills: Super Numerate (a gift for calculation), ambidextrous, lightning reflexes.
 
My trappings: suit of decent, light-weight clothes, including sandals. A knife is carried, tucked in the belt, alongside a purse of 10 Gold Crowns.
 
My career: 99! Wizard’s Apprentice!
My career skills: Arcane Language: Magick; Cast Spells: Petty Magic only; Read/Write; Secret Language: Classical, Scroll Lore
 
I start with: (Level 1+1) spell points: 2
 
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So, in short:
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Konrad Fuchs, Wizard’s Apprentice
(from Eschendorf in Stirland) 
1,70m tall, 50 yrs
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Trappings: suit of decent, light-weight clothes, sandals. Knife tucked in the belt, 10 Gold Crowns.
Skills: Super Numerate (a gift for calculation), ambidextrous, lightning reflexes, Arcane Language: Magick; Cast Spells: Petty Magic only; Read/Write; Secret Language: Classical, Scroll Lore
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4 Fate Points
2 Spell points

I’m a wizard’s apprentice, so I might know, let’s say, 1d6 petty spells: I roll 2d6 and take the higher result: 4. Then, I pick the spells from the list: Butterfingers, Cunning Hand, Flight of Amar and Magic Alarm. Each petty spell costs 1 spell point if I fail the roll.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Relevant Reposts: Combining D&D, OSR and Old School with freeform play

source: https://2warpstoneptune.com/2014/04/23/dungeons-dragons-club-1984/
Two years ago, I posted the following article. In light of the continued success of FKR, I think it’s a good thing to repost it:
OK, so you have some edition of D&D at home. Or another old school game, Traveller, Bushido, I don’t know. Or any of the millions of OSR games (hint: Chris McDowall’s Into the Odd/Electric Bastionland is da shiat).

But now you’ve taken a look at the rules, and you’re not sure if you’ll ever be able to play that game. How is anyone supposed to remember all those things? Page upon page upon page of rules. How?

Freeform roleplay to the rescue!

You can still keep your books, there’s so much inspiration in them, you’ll see. What you want to do if you’re overwhelmed by the sheer amount of numbers and rules and pages is this:

  1. Create a character with the rules set you have. Don’t sweat it, there’s no need to stick slavishly to the rules in the book. Follow the character creation rules as well as you can. Boom, your character is ready to leap headfirst into adventure (or into the mouth of a green-faced stone demon face, as the case may be).
  2. Read this blog post: https://darkwormcolt.wordpress.com/2018/10/03/play-worlds-not-rules-part-3-playing-around-with-dice/. It contains everything you need to know to start playing NOW. The founding fathers of our hobby played like that, and what was good for them is good for us.
  3. Understand that rules are only a necessary evil. What’s important is the game, is playing with friends and family at the table, moving miniatures around (or not), scribbling, planning, laughing, acting. That’s the important part. Don’t let your imagination be drowned by tons of rules. Early roleplaying games didn’t rely on any rulebook — because there were no rulebooks yet. Play the world, not the rules.

Playing Troika! with the Landshut rules: REDUX

SKILL
Skill in Troika! is used for all saves, so it’s a very important number. It’s rolled with 1d3+3, so it has a range between 4 and 6. 4=low skill, 6=high skill. Medium skill is not worth writing down.

STAMINA
Roll 2d6+12. If the sum is 16 or lower, write down “fragile”. If the sum is 22 or more, write down “resilient” or “tough”.

LUCK!
Roll 1d6+6. If the sum is 7, write down “luckless”. If the sum is 13, write down “lucky”. Grant the player rerolls if the character is lucky, or force him to reroll if the character has no luck.

POSSESSIONS
Conveniently enough, Troika! provides a rule for starting gear. Of course, I’m using this, as well: start with 2d6 silver pence, a knife, a lantern&flask of oil, a rucksack and 6 provisions.

BACKGROUNDS
Determine your background, using either the book or one of the gazillions of available Troika! classes online.

ADVANCED SKILLS
Just write down the Advanced Skills without the numbers. If you feel better with quantifiers, add descriptions like “very good sleight-of-hands”, or “expert in grappling”.

MAKING ROLLS
When casting spells, making saves, testing your mettle, make opposed 2d6 rolls. Ref grants bonus if the situation warrants it.

Making a Landshut Troika! character:
Skill: I roll a 3 – so my character is “skilled”.

For Stamina, I roll 7, so it’s 19 points in total: average. I don’t write this down.
My Luck is 7: out of luck! 
I start with 8 silver pence, a knife, a lantern&flask of oil, a rucksack and 6 provisions.
I could roll d66 to determine my background, but I’m picking one I discovered last Saturday on Troika! discord: the Man of Arms, written by Lejeune:

So, my character looks like this:

______________________________________________________
Herbert von Mirskofen, a luckless Man-of-Arms
skilled
out of luck

Advanced Skills:
Sleight-of-hands 
Knife-fighting
Grappling 
Holding things
Possessions: 8 silver pence, a knife, a lantern&flask of oil, rucksack, provisions, fine deck of cards, debt to a warlock, six painted knives, bow tie
______________________________________________________

Playing the GLOG with The Landshut rules: REDUX

1. Stats
The only exceptional attribute I roll is Intelligence (15). 

2. Template (Classes)
I pick the Wizard template A. Wizards are weakly creatures, so they are not able to take lots of damage.
My abilities are:
Spellcasting: 1 Magic Die, 1 Spell Slot, and I get two spells
I decide to be an Orthodox Wizard. I roll for my spells and start with Levitate and Lock.

3. Race
I’m a Sparrowling.

4. Attack rolls
Opposed 2d6; better fighter might add a bonus. Ref determines.

5. Gear
I pick 2d6 items: 8.
Leather armor
Sword 
Dog
Blank magic book
ink + quill
waterskin
Donkey
Dagger

…and now I lose 1d6 of them: 4
The d8 determines which items must go: donkey, waterskin, blank magic book, ink+quill.

What remains is:

  • Leather armor
  • Sword
  • Dog
  • Dagger

6. Powers
Since the GLOG has a detailed magic system, I decide to not grant any more powers to starting characters.

The final version of my character:

______________________________________________________________
Gerhard, Sparrowling Orthodox Wizard, Level 1
Templates: Wizard A

very intelligent

Magic Dice: 1
Spells: Levitate, Lock

Gear: Leather armor, sword, dog (“Sprite”), dagger
______________________________________________________________

Playing OD&D with The Landshut Rules: REDUX

1) Roll abilities
For every 15+, I write down “very” + the adjective that belongs to the characteristic, and for every 5 or lower, I write down the opposite of the adjective. All other numbers signify an unremarkable, average stat.

2) Character Classes
Fighting-men: can take more damage than other humans, use all weapons and armor
Magic-users: weakly, use dagger/staff, no armor
Clerics: can cast spells, no sharp weapons
Hobbit: resilient, no huge weapons
Dwarf: can take a lot of damage, no long weapons
Elf: choose to be either a sorcerer or a warrior, no blunt weapons

3) Spells

Clerics, Magic-users and elves get Spell Points. Magic-users get 4+Experience Level points, all other casters get 2+Level points. 
All casters can cast spells of any level. A save is required to cast a spell successfully and avoid paying Spell Points. A failed roll means you lose Spell Points equal to the spell level. 
The referee might consider giving out treasure that increases Spell Points. This might be done to counterbalance the more costly higher level spells (compared to the old system). 
To record spells, casters can write, draw, etch, tattoo or paint the formulas on every suitable surface. 
4) Attacks
Opposed 2d6 rolls + bonus for the better fighter
5) Damage
Ref determines damage with common sense, narratively. Knowledge of the genre is a big plus.

6) Give them a fighting chance
Lenient referees, you might grant the player a last opposed roll to save their character from dying.

7) Experience
Gain an experience level if it is dramatically appropriate.

So let’s create a character already!

Abilities:
STR: 11, average, what I write on the character sheet: nothing
INT: 9, average, , what I write on the character sheet: nothing
WIS: 6, average, , what I write on the character sheet: nothing
CON: 7, average, , what I write on the character sheet: nothing
DEX: 6, average, what I write on the character sheet: nothing
CHA: 13, average, , what I write on the character sheet: nothing

I play a fighting-man. 

The original Gygax game uses no skills, so let’s skip this step in the Landshut rules and go straight to equipment:

I pick 2d6 items: 7
1. Sword
2. Dagger
3. Plate Mail
4. Iron Rations for 1 week
5. Backpack, leather
6. Water skin
7. Mallet and three stakes

…and I lose 1d6 of them: 2

Rolling 1d6, I get a 2 and lose the dagger, so my new equipment list looks like this:

1. Sword
2. Dagger
3. Plate Mail
4. Iron Rations for 1 week
5. Backpack, leather
6. Water skin
7. Mallet and three stakes

I roll 1d6 again and start at the dagger: a 5. I count down 5 steps and land at the mallet. My final equipment list:

1. Sword
2. Plate Mail (counts as +10 HP)
3. Iron Rations for 1 week
4. Backpack, leather
5. Water skin

And last but not least, I get to pick two “powers”: special equipment, special abilities, connections, and similar stuff:

I can see in the dark just like a cat. And someone high up in the hierarchy owes me a favor.

This is what my original edition Landshut rules character looks like:

___________________________________________________
Splint Brackwater
Level 1 Fighting-man
Can see in the dark like a cat. Someone high up in the hierarchy owes him a favor. 

Sword, Plate Mail, Iron Rations for 1 week, Backpack (leather), Water skin
___________________________________________________

It’s not about equipment

Character equipment still plays an important role in OSR games. Seeing where the OSR play style comes from, that’s understandable. 

But for FKR games? Is equipment for FKR heroes as important as for OSR characters? I doubt it. If I take a look back at the pre-D&D scene, the time of the two Daves, Braunstein, Blackmoor, Prof. MAR Barker, Tekumel, the first thing I notice is that varying damage (in the sense of ‘roll a d6 for a dagger, and a d10 for a zweihänder’) was not around yet. So, apart from the fact that each weapon has its own advantages and disadvantages, there was no need to get ‘a better weapon’ so the character could do more damage.

Also, contrary to what many Original D&D players (or better: forum members) are claiming, pre-any-school roleplaying was LESS lethal for the characters than the first couple of editions of D&D. The reason for this is simple: Braunsteins and early Blackmoor was about adventure. Sure, you had your dungeons, but pre-hit point roleplaying was less about grimdark survival, and more about a shared fantasy experience.

If FKR is playing worlds, not rules – then your character is not their equipment

The premise I’m using often for FKR gaming is Chirine ba Kal’s “play worlds, not rules”. Take your favorite book and turn it into a sourcebook for your games. I’m certain the main protagonist of that book is not defined by their equipment. That equipment might help describe him (a narrative device, then), but it’s not used to define him. Exceptions confirm the rule. Literary character are defined by their actions and interactions. Again, gear is just a diegetic tool to help with the description.

I think this is important because, at least to me, this means a shift away from the tight focus on gear, to a tight focus on behavior and, if you like that in your game, character archetypes. There is a reason why I love John S. Ross’s rpg Risus so much. Not because of the system, it doesn’t really interest me. What makes Risus shine is its concept of clichés: A character is described with clichés – genre-typical descriptions. For instance: A tight-lipped Barbarian from the North with scarred forearms. Instantly, you form a mental picture. 

But there’s more to clichés than just this. In all probability, you also intuit his abilities and predispositions: fighting. Enduring harsh weather. Drinking. Resilience. You just know them.

That’s the power of clichés. And of course, John S. Ross didn’t invent them, but he was the first to introduce them to roleplaying games. A stroke of genius.

Let’s stay with clichés just a little longer. So we have…

A tight-lipped Barbarian from the North with scarred forearms

Another question: Can you imagine what equipment this barbarian is carrying?

Of course you can! A sword. A flask. Heavy fur boots. Drab. Fur cap. A backpack. Jerky. 

The power of clichés at work.

So what really matters is not equipment lists or “starting equipment” (a perennial favorite in OSR circles), but a good, solid character description. And clichés work best for that.

This does not mean equipment is not important. But it should spring naturally from the character description, instead of the other way around.

In Risus, a character’s gear is called “Tools of the Trade”. This gear comes with the character. And you, the player, determine what these tools are.

Just one last example, a longer one this time:

Henry Dorsett Case
(Neuromancer, William Gibson)

“A year here and he still dreamed of cyberspace, hope fading nightly. All the speed he took, all the turns he’d taken and the corners he’d cut in Night City, and still he’d see the matrix in his sleep, bright lattices of logic unfolding across that colorless void….The Sprawl was a long strange way home over the Pacific now, and he was no console man, no cyberspace cowboy. Just another hustler, trying to make it through. But the dreams came on in the Japanese night like livewire voodoo, and he’d cry for it, cry in his sleep, and wake alone in the dark, curled in his capsule in some coffin hotel, his hands clawed into the bedslab, temperfoam bunched between his fingers, trying to reach the console that wasn’t there.”

So… “Washed-up console cowboy with a drug problem”.

And you know how he looks. You intuit his skills. You can imagine his “starting gear”.

Isn’t this amazing?

One class, four OSR games: the Yogi for Whitehack, The Black Hack, Macciato Monsters and Into the Odd

Today, let’s talk about the Yogi as character class. Because, you know, I practice yoga, and I love the OSR. I’m using bullete’s version for this experiment.

First, a write-up of the yogi’s abilities that I find interesting in close to reality:

  • ahimsa (nonviolence) practice is key
  • focus on own willpower rather than on supernatural beings
  • must be lawful
  • may never possess more than what they can carry on their person
  • avoid contact with precious metals or jewelry
  • no use of magic items
  • no use of weapons
  • no armor
  • yogi spells are called “siddhis” (“powers”). Choose only nonviolent spells: The following siddhis may be chosen: All cleric spells except spells against Law and the following: Hold Person, Sticks to Snakes, Insect Plague, Quest, and Raise Dead. Magic user spells: Read Languages, Detect Invisibility, Knock, ESP, Levitate, Darkvision, Fly, Protection from Normal Missiles, Water Breathing, Wizard Eye, Contact Other Plane, Passwall, Telekinesis, Teleport, and Anti-Magic Shell.
  • 3rd level:  Simulate Death, lowering his heart beat and body temperature, and appearing not to breathe. This state can be maintained for d6 turns per level, once per day.
  • Saving Throw: Yogis receive a +3 bonus on saving throws vs. poison and paralysis.
  • Obtain devotees: At ninth level, the Yogi will attract a large number of loyal followers who will swear fealty to the character and wish to do good deeds in his or her name.




Let’s play with Whitehack first:

Is the yogi deft, strong or wise?

I’d argue a yogi is, first and foremost, a Wise Yogi. This also gives him the ability to “use siddhis” (cast spells). So, a Wise Yogi it is.

On level 1, Wise characters have: 1d6+1 HD, Attack Value (roll on or under) 10, Saving Throw 6, 2 Slots (special abilities, one active, the other one inactive), and belong to two Groups.

Let’s do this:

Mahadev, level 1 Wise Yogi
Str 7 (Truly Lawful), Dex 10, Con 12, Int 14, Wis 12 (Yogi), Cha 7; Saving Throw 6 (9 vs. poison/paralysis), HP 6, AC 0, Attack Value 10, Siddhis: “Eternal Peace” (active)/”Joyous Freedom” (inactive); Common tongue; loincloth, skull cup, small bag of bhang

If you’re wondering what the remarks behind Strength and Wisdom (in parantheses) mean: Those are the yogi’s “groups” (affiliation and vocation). Whenever a Str or Wis save is in order and the group is appropriate for the task, the save is rolled with advantage.

Supernatural powers in WH are freeform and powered by hit points; each time one is used, the player specifies how exactly he wants to interpret it at this moment. Then, DM and player negotiate the price in hp.

If the WH yogi had to defend himself physically, he would try to roll on or under his Attack Value, but over the opponent’s Armor Class. Successful roll means: inflict unarmed damage (1 point). If the opponent attacked him, the DM would try to roll the d20 on or under the opponent’s Attack Value (HD+10)




Now, The Black Hack (1e):

A long time ago, I converted the Yogi class to TBH:

Starting HP: d4 + 4
HP Per Level/Resting: 1d4
Weapons & Armor: no weapons and shields at all, yogis practice ahimsa (non-violence) 

Attack Damage: 1d4 / 1 point Unarmed or Improvising
Ahimsa Die: Levels 1-2: 1d4; levels 3-8: 1d6; levels 9-10: 1d8

The Ahimsa Die is a Usage Die that tracks the non-violent behavior of the Yogi. Patience is a virtue, but it‘s also hard work. When the Yogi runs out of patience, he loses his special powers for that day. More on that in the following paragraph.
Siddhi Points: Level+2; cast spells of any level. Casting a successful spell requires a WIS check as per TBH rules. Spells don’t work automatically, you have to pass the check. On a failed roll, it costs Siddhi Points to cast the spell (cost  = spell level). On a successful roll, you cast the spell for free. 



SPECIAL FEATURES
Non-violence: (ahimsa): Yogis must begin as lawful in alignment and remain so or else lose the special powers given to them. Also, if they use violence „in word, thought or action“, they roll their Ahimsa Die. If the die comes up a 1 or 2, reduce it by one step, as usual. If the Ahimsa Die is a d4 and is reduced further, the Yogi loses all their siddhis (spells) for that day. After sunrise and a meditation that lasts (Exyperience Level) hours, the Ahimsa Die is „re-charged“ again. Yes, that‘s right, the higher up you get in Yoga, the longer it takes to recover from lapses.
Possessions: Yogis are severely limited in the amount of possessions they may have – they may never possess more than what they can carry on their person, they avoid contact with gold or jewelry, and may not carry more than the equivalent of 1 coin worth of other types of treasure. They may not use magic items.

Spell casting: A Yogi gains siddhis, or supernatural, mental powers which correspond to some cleric and magic user spells. In order to obtain these, the yogi must spend one hour in meditation per spell, per day.

In addition, at 3rd level the Yogi may Simulate Death, lowering his heart beat and body temperature, and appearing not to breathe. This state can be maintained for d6 minutes per level, once per day.
Saving Throw: Yogis receive a +3 bonus on saving throws vs. poison and paralysis.
Charisma Bonus: At 2nd level and every level thereafter, Yogis automatically add 1 point to their

charisma score, up to a maximum score of 20.
Obtain devotees: At ninth level, the Yogi will attract a large number of loyal followers who will swear fealty to the character and wish to do good deeds in his or her name.
SIDDHIS
The following siddhis may be chosen:

All cleric spells except spells against Law and the following: Hold Person, Quest, and Raise Dead. • Magic user spells: Read Languages, Knock, Levitate, Darkvision, Telekinesis, Teleport 

The TBH Yogi looks like this:

Mahadev, level 1 Yogi
Str 7, Dex 10, Con 12, Int 14, Wis 12, Cha 7; HP 10, damage: d4/1, Ahimsa Die: 1d4; Siddhi Points: 3, loincloth, skull cup, small bag of bhang

If the TBH yogi had to defend himself physically, he would try to roll on or under his Strength. Successful roll means: inflict unarmed damage (1 point). If the opponent attacked him, the player would try to make a STR save, or (house rule) the DM would try to roll on or over the yogi’s Str, or simply roll higher than the yogi.





Macchiato Monsters

Macchiato Monsters takes inspiration from The Black Hack and Whitehack, as the name implies.

  • In MM, you first roll the stats: we have already done that.
  • Then, you invent a Trait (origins, factions, occupations, race): Yogi. Whenever the trait is relevant, roll with advantage.
  • Now, record your hit die; this always starts with a d6.
  • Now, pick two: add a d6 to a low stat, write down another trait, add another hit die, martial training (step up your hit dice), specialist training (a daily special ability), or magic training (come up with two freeform spells, essentially like Whitehack) –
  • First pick: specialist training (“Simulate Death”, as described in the ability list in the beginning of this blog post: The yogi is lowering his heart beat and body temperature, and appears not to breathe. This state can be maintained for d6 turns per level, once per day)
  • Second pick: magic training – the siddhis are: “Eternal Peace” and “Joyous Freedom”

The MM Yogi looks like this:

Mahadev, level 1 Yogi
Trait: Yogi, Str 7, Dex 10, Con 12, Int 14, Wis 12, Cha 7; HP 6, no armor, no weapons, Siddhis: “Eternal Peace” and Joyous Freedom”, loincloth, skull cup, small bag of bhang

If the yogi had to defend himself physically, he would try to roll on or under his Str. Successful roll means: roll damage (2d4, take lower). If the yogi rolled higher, that would mean the opponent hit him.



Into the Odd

Into the Odd is the enfant terrible in the OSR scene. No because it’s not behaving well (author Chris McDowall is one of the nicest guys I know online), but because it’s breaking traditions deliberately. As a result, ItO is not only very slim, but it plays lightning fast.

So let’s try to fit the original class into ItO.

First of all, stats: only three of them: Str, Dex und Cha.
HP: 1d6, further damage is subtracted from Str; If Str=0 then dead
There are no classes in ItO, but at the moment, more and more people are creating them, anyway (even Chris himself)
Spells are either spell items or skills. For the yogi, it has to be skills.

So, the ItO Yogi:

Reach Eternal Peaceful Liberation by unmasking not-reality as illusion. Do this by practicing non-violent (ahimsa) and introspective methods. If you reach Level 5 without harming anyone on purpose, you reach Moksha (liberation) and can rest, finally.

Choose something that disturbs your peacefulness.
  1. Cruelty against insects.

  2. Cruelty against animals.
  3. Cruelty against human beings.
  4. Injustice.
  5. Loud children.
  6. Busy marketplaces.


UPGRADES
Start with 1.
Take 1 when you:
  • lived an entire month in the world (“in the marketplace”), in ahimsa

  • stayed peaceful in the middle of raging violence

  1. Move Immovable Objects: You can persuade small doors and walls to move.
  2. Create gems: You can create gemstones out of thin air.
  3. No pain: You feel no pain. Critical injuries don’t exist for you. You keep moving and standing till you die with Str 0. 
  4. Come closer, Beloved One: You can move the sun closer to you or farther away from you.

The ItO Yogi looks like this:

Mahadev, level 1 Yogi
Yogi, Str 7, Dex 10, Cha 7; HP 6, no armor, no weapons, Siddhis: “Eternal Peace” and Joyous Freedom”, loincloth, skull cup, small bag of bhang

If the yogi had to defend himself physically, he would simply roll 1d4 for damage (no to-hit roll). The opponent would do the same.










Chaos Monk, Into the Odd style


I know. You’ve seen his cousin.
But today: the Chaos Monk, Into the Odd style, but keeping the original hp.

STR 10
DEX 11
CHA 9

HD: 1d5 = 2

Starting abilities:
– no armor allowed
– use only lame weapons 🙂
– are only surprised on a 1 in 8, and only if “spoken to by a member of the opposite gender”

Abilities:

  • Reaching 2nd level: “kung-fu kick” (d5 at level 2, d6 at level 3, d8 at level 5)
  • Reaching 3rd level: Speak with Fungi.
  • Reaching 4th level: Flip over the back of their opponent while making a high-pitched scream.
  • Reaching 6th level: cast Confusion once a day on not just themselves but others.
  • Reaching 8th level: Five Point Palm Exploding Heart Technique. It is unclear whether this has any real mechanical effect however.





War Bear, freestyle D&D version

Again, Hill Cantons, man!

This time, Chris’s war bear class. Awesome!
I’m rolling the stats, 3d6 in order, and switch them around till I like them, and arrive at this:

STR 14
DEX 12
CON 14
INT 10
WIS 10
CHA 7

Saves: roll on or under the most appropriate stat

HD: 1d8+2 = 8

Now, I’m opening my post “Quick rules for playing D&D, any edition” in a new window.

The war bear’s starting abilities:
– no armor other than a helmet, instead they have a base armor class + DEX bonus (DEX/3–3, round down)
– bonus +1 to hit and damage when using polearms
– after 1 day without seeing a polearm, lose 1 hp per day till you get your fix
– unarmed damage: 2 attacks per round with 1d4 damage each

OK, Armor: DEX bonus = 1; base armor class (descending AC) is 6; this translates to 13 (ascending AC), or 3 points above “naked” —> Armor is 3.
To-hit: roll on or under (9+HD) = 10

For everything else, use MoldHammer.

Plus, this house rule to speed up combat, BUT still keep the tension of a good dice duel, is really good: https://blog.thesconesalone.com/2020/03/idea-for-speeding-up-d-combat.html

Chaos Monk, freestyle D&D version

I’ve been on a D&D trip, lately.
And Hill Cantons, Chris Kutalik’s brilliant creation, Hill Cantons, man! Anyway, I digress. Chris posted his tongue-in-cheek Cahos Monk class a few years ago. I’m still in love with it. Its sheer Napoleon Dynamite-ness is breathtaking. I want to play a chaos monk, right here and now!

…and all the D&D versions I have sitting on my shelves are way too complicated.

So, I’m rolling the six stats, 3d6 in order, and switch them around till I like them, and arrive at this:

STR 10
DEX 11
CON 6
INT 12
WIS 11
CHA 9

Saves: roll on or under the most appropriate stat

HD: 1d5 = 2

Now, I’m opening my post “Quick rules for playing D&D, any edition” in a new window.

Then, I’m taking a look at the Chaos Monk’s starting abilities:
– no armor allowed
– add (DEX/3 –3, rounded down), and +1 per 2 levels to armor
– use only lame weapons 🙂
– are only surprised on a 1 in 8, and only if “spoken to by a member of the opposite gender”

OK, Armor: DEX bonus = 0
To-hit: roll on or under (9+HD) = 10

For everything else, use MoldHammer.